autojumbled

Posts tagged "celica"

Whilst pulling everything off the top of the engine to get to the spark plugs for a compression test, I found oil residue on top of the cam cover and around the edges, particularly at the rear of engine. This is a common area for the 3SGTE to leak as over time, the cam cover and it's gasket can loosen up and the angle of the engine encourages oil to leak from the rear edge. Inspection & Removal It was easy to see once I started removing the cam cover why there was an oil leak. The retaining screws were less than hand tight. One screw is particularly tricky to get to at the rear and this was barely done up! You can see from the below picture that the oil leak was also affecting cylinder #1. An oily HT plug and pooling oil around the spark plug indicated a failing inner cam cover gasket. After disconnecting the breather pipes from the cover, removing the throttle body/inlet manifold support bracket and then negotiating the wiring loom at the cam gear end of the engine, the cover was finally off. Cleanup Before repainting, the cam cover first needed to have the various layers of gasket sealer removed from the mating edge. This was done using a blade edge from a Stanley knife and a screw driver blade for the hard to reach areas. Next came a thorough wire wheel brush (fitted to a power drill) over the top side of the cover to remove the worst of the crusty dirt, followed by a clean with POR-15 Cleaner & Degreaser. Once happy all dirt and grease was removed I used POR-15 Metal Prep on the top side for a final clean and to etch ready for painting. For the paint I went with high-temp but wanted something shiny so opted for VHT's Anodized Purple. Purchased along with the silver base coat from www.frost.co.uk. A couple of coats later and I ended up with this: It's not perfect but then it's going to spend it's life sat under an intercooler so a semi-ok finish is fine for this application. I also did not bake the cover once painted. My hope is that I can take care of this when using the car again! Refitting As with most things, refitting was the opposite of removal but with a few new parts and fixings used to smarten the job up. New rubber gaskets (both inner & outer) were fitted to the cam cover (baught from TCB Parts), along with a bead of gasket sealant (similar to the classic Toyota Black) which was then left for 10 mins before fitting the cover to the engine to allow the sealant to go off slightly. This stops it oozing everywhere and makes a better seal. Also replaced during the refit were the retaining screws. I binned the posi-drive headed screws and opted for a set of stainless steel allen-head bolts with new washers (purchased through an eBay shop). These allowed me to ensure the cam cover was correctly tightened down to the head. In doing so I did have to loosen and move the throttle body assembly out of the way in order to get everything done up to torque. One final piece when replacing everything was cleaning and painting the throttle inlet support bracket and the throttle cable bracket. May as well tidy as you go on jobs like these! Spark Plug Replacement With the cam cover refreshed, the oil leak fixed and the top of the engine back together, the final thing to do was swap out the spark plugs for new items. The old plugs were well used but came out easily. Cylinder 1's plug had been sat in oil but on closer inspection, this hadn't made it any further down the thread to the piston chamber. I replaced all 4 with new platinum NGK BKR6EP-8. These and all the gaskets for the cover came from www.tcbparts.co.uk. With these small service jobs completed, a little piece of mind is given that the GT4 will survive a drive or two! More Celica GT4 resto jobs to come - the list is long!

Celica GT4 Spark Plug & Cam Cover Replacement

Whilst pulling everything off the top of the engine to get to the spark plugs for a compression test, I found oil residue on top of the cam cover and around the edges, particularly at the rear of engine. This is a common area for the 3SGTE to leak as
I touched on it in my previous post but my new Celica GT4 was in need of a service when I picked her up. Even though I have tonnes of receipts and documents in the car's history folder, for my own piece of mind I wanted to ensure I did all I could to prolong my driving enjoyment. First up is performing a compression test to check the health of the pistons and rings to ease my mind that there's some life left in the engine! Compression Test With the TMIC removed, access to the top of the engine is possible. Each cylinder was tested in turn by removing a single spark plug and screwing in the tester in it's place. I then removed the EFI relay from the main fuse box (located next to the battery) to allow me to turn over the car without it firing up. The ignition was cranked for 3-5 seconds and then the results of the tester gauge checked. The gauge is then reset, the tester removed and spark plug replaced. The whole process is then repeated again for the remaining 3 cylinders. What we're looking for ideally is all 4 results to be within ~10% of each other. As you can see from these images, the results are hovering around 170-180 PSI. In this case, I'm happy given the age of the car and mileage of the engine (Odo is reading 127000 miles but I am yet to discover if that is a mix of KM's and Mile's - the history may tell me if its been played with). What is also evident from the pictures is the oil marks on the top of the cam cover. That's the next job, source and fix the oil blow/leak! Next up: Replace the spark plugs with NGK BKR6EP-8. Remove, clean, paint and replace the cam cover using all-new gaskets and retaining bolts. Fixing the oil leak from the rear of the engine in the process.

Celica GT4 Compression Test

I touched on it in my previous post but my new Celica GT4 was in need of a service when I picked her up. Even though I have tonnes of receipts and documents in the car's history folder, for my own piece of mind I wanted to ensure I did
I’ve been super quiet on the blog for quite a while now. During the time away, I’ve owned a Honda Integra Type R (DC2) and then a SEAT Leon FR. The DC2 had to make way for the diesel Leon as I took a job with a 120 mile round-trip and I sure as hell wasn’t going to pile all those miles onto a lovely clean ITR! As it stands, I think the ITR maybe my favourite car I’ve owned so far in terms of £-for-£ enjoyment. My only gripe with it was that it never went wrong and so I never got a chance to do much spannering! This is perhaps why I never got around to writing about it… Anyway, onward again to diesel ownership. Eventually got bored of the Leon, despite it being new and very perky. Also returned a decent MPG for the long commute. I just couldn’t bond with it in the way I have with previous cars. Decided to change for a cheaper, diesel run around and so picked up an Nissan Almera SXE which fits the bill nicely. This allowed me to add a second car to the fleet, a 1990 Toyota Celica GT4 ST185. Getting Started As you can see, I have my work cut out to bring this Japanese classic back to some form of dignity. I’ve no idea what previous owners were thinking with the new stickers or the wheel choice but I have aimed to undo these mistakes and make good any previous bodges. So far, the list of rectifications include: Remove all non-original stickers (this is pretty much all of them!). Changed out the wheels for something a little less ‘barry’ and more Japanese styled. A set of Enkei RP01’s. Removed the screw-type manual boost controller and set the car back to standard boost levels. Removed what I assume was a fuel cut defender which was wired into the MAP sensor. Swapped the Bailey’s BOV for an HKS SSQV. As a result the car now is running standard power levels and so hopefully with no weird over boost potential issues…..and it looks better! Still a loooong way to go though! Being almost 30 years old, the GT4 has it’s fair share of age-related issues that need sorting out and most of those I will get to in time. When I picked it up it had a valid MOT (not entirely sure how to be honest) and so I wanted to drive it for a couple months over the summer before garaging. This meant I concentrated on making sure the engine was as sound as it could be after all the abuse it’s likely had. Engine refresh jobs have so far included: New oil and filter change with new drain plug. New spark plugs after a compression test (results came out fairly close together across all cylinders so OK for now). Fixed oil leak from rear of cam cover by removing/cleaning/replacing with new gaskets and fixing bolts. Unfortunately I didn’t get around to a fuel filter change and coolant flush.  Mainly because after inspecting the various components I’m certain that once I start fiddling with them they will either fall apart or seize up.  For example, the radiator is fairly corroded and therefore a new one is definitely needed.  They’ll be the first jobs to get done when I’m getting it ready to get back out on the road. Future Plans Now that the MOT has expired and won’t be able to pass the test without a number of jobs completing, the GT4 is confined to the garage where I can start work on the number of restoration jobs I’d like to tackle. When planning the jobs I have decided that wherever possible, I will try not to have more than 1 or 2 different jobs on the go at the same time.  The idea being to minimise the length of time the car is off the road in between tasks, as well as ensuring I don’t forget where bits go when I put it back together! Essentially, the aim isn’t to have a restoration project where it sits in the garage for 3 years whilst I do every job I can think of. Famous last words….

Celica GT4 ST185

I’ve been super quiet on the blog for quite a while now. During the time away, I’ve owned a Honda Integra Type R (DC2) and then a SEAT Leon FR. The DC2 had to make way for the diesel Leon as I took a job with a 120